Weekly Movie Reviews: Jul 16-22, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

Léon: The Professional (1994)

Unlike the rest of this week’s movies, I’ve watched Léon before so I feel slightly bad about giving it the favorite movie of the week, but it’s just so good! I’m a fan of Luc Besson in general, and although I haven’t seen some of his movies, this one has to be his masterpiece.

Léon (Jean Reno) is a professional assassin (or “cleaner”) who lives a ordered and quiet life in New York City. When a family living next door to him is murdered by corrupt DEA agents, he reluctantly takes in the sole survivor, precocious 12 year old Mathilda (played by 12 year old Natalie Portman in her debut). Léon is a little slow and not used to sharing his life with anybody and Mathilda is young and starved for emotional attention. They make an unlikely but deadly pair, especially after Mathilda persuades Léon to make her his apprentice.

It’s hard to describe what I like about this movie because everything about it is just right. The neo-noir atmosphere, the unconventional but compelling relationship between Léon and Mathilda, Gary Oldman’s over-the-top but terrifying performance as the villainous DEA agent Stansfield, Jean Reno’s subtle portrayal of Léon… I could go on for a while. Natalie Portman’s acting deserves special praise, though, she makes you simultaneously uncomfortable and want to take care of her.

Other Movies Watched

The Anthem of the Heart (2015)

Jun Naruse talked constantly when she was a child, but after innocently telling her mother about seeing her father with another woman leads to their divorce, she is cursed to not be able to talk without extreme pain. In high school, she’s a quiet girl with no friends, but that changes when her teacher appoints her to the committee putting on a community outreach event. The other three members of the committee slowly become her friends, especially a boy named Takumi. I loved this movie, I thought it was a fairly standard romance in the beginning, but it didn’t go where I expected it to go at all. Although this movie centers around Jun, all four teenagers have their own satisfying growth arcs. My husband is a big fan of the anime series’ that the writer of this movie is involved in so I’m going to have to check those out.

Easy A (2010)

To get out of spending the weekend with her friend and her weird hippie parents, high school student Olive Penderghast lies to her friend about having a date and losing her virginity. The rumor quickly spreads, and Olive soon finds herself in the business of pretending to have sex with her classmates and dealing with the consequences. I thought this movie was fantastic, it’s clearly inspired by John Hughes (and has several references to his movies), and it’s got a lot of heart. Emma Stone steals the show as Olive, she’s smart, charming, and pretty. Unlike a lot of teen movies, this isn’t about social acceptance or teen angst, Olive is someone who is perfectly happy with herself and she solves her own problems – I found that very identifiable.

The Garden of Words (2013)

We’re continuing to go through Makoto Shinkai’s movies, and this 45 min movie (is there a name for a movie that short? I’d call it a novella or a novelette if it was a book) was next on our list, and the last one before his new critically acclaimed movie, Your Name. It tells the story of a 15 year old boy and a 27 year old woman who become unlikely friends after meeting in the park. I think Shinkai is in his element when he’s focusing on just a couple of characters, and this is one of his best movies so far. The characterization is fantastic, not much happens in this movie, but the payoff rests on coming to terms with yourself and your feelings, rather than anything external.

True Grit (2010)

Fourteen year old Mattie Ross is determined to avenge her father’s death and hires the U.S. Marshal with the meanest reputation around, Rooster Cogburn, to hunt down the killer, hired hand Tom Chaney. LaBouef, a Texas Ranger who has also been hunting Chaney for a while joins them in their journey. I love Westerns and I’ve been on a bit of a Hailee Steinfield kick recently, so this movie was right up my alley. I’m not always a big fan of the Coen brothers’ style, they’re often flat and cold, but this doesn’t suffer from those flaws. The central trio (played by Hailee Steinfield, Jeff Bridges, and Matt Damon) are all excellent and even though the characters don’t often like each other, they still form a tight bond. I can’t believe Hailee Steinfield was only thirteen when this movie was made, her composure is admirable.

The Frighteners (1996)

The Frighteners is one of Peter Jackson’s pre-Lord of the Rings movies. Former architect Frank Bannister (Michael J. Fox) has gained the ability to see and communicate with ghosts after a car accident. He uses this to his full-advantage, getting his ghost friends to haunt rich people’s homes to drum up business for his paranormal consulting agency. But when a real monster starts killing people, Frank is the only one equipped to help, and he’s in way over his head. Any movie starring Michael J. Fox doing something that can be described as “hijinks” or “shenanigans” starts off at a pretty good place, and this movie definitely qualifies. It’s very campy and the actors seem to be having great fun with their parts (especially Jeffrey Combs, who I know from various iconic Star Trek roles but have never seen in a real movie before). Don’t expect it to be anything like the Lord of the Rings movies, though.

American Dreamz (2006)

American Dreamz is a satire centered around a TV show clearly based on American Idol. Hugh Grant plays British host/judge/producer Martin Tweed, Mandy Moore plays all-American contestant Sally who is prepared to do anything to win, Sam Golzari plays Omer, a member of a terrorist cell who loves showtunes and ends up being a contestant, and Dennis Quaid plays the President, whose chief-of-staff pushes him to judge an episode of the show to improve his public image. I’ve never seen American Idol, so some jokes probably went over my head, but most of the movie takes place outside of the show. It’s a mediocre movie, although sometimes it was pretty funny. Dennis Quaid’s quasi-George W. Bush was especially good. It’s also got some heart from Sam Golzari’s character, and Hugh Grant is lovable even when he’s a bastard, and those two made the movie somewhat better.

The Circle (2017)

Mae Holland (Emma Watson) gets a customer support job at the Circle, a technology company that’s kind of like Google and Facebook and Amazon combined. Its culture is insidious and soon starts to take over her life. This movie sounded terrible when I first heard about it, despite the impressive cast and Tom Hanks producing it. But as someone who writes software for the web professionally and is concerned about digital privacy issues, I had to see it. It was actually worse than I expected it to be, its tone does not work at all and it seems confused about the kind of story it wanted to tell – it shifts suddenly between being a satire, a thriller, a drama, a dystopian-future movie and so on. Emma Watson was not a good choice for the part of Mae (I loved her as Hermione but haven’t liked her in anything since) – she’s stiff and her accent is wrong (my husband had to tell me she was playing an American, I assumed she was a British expat), and she makes it impossible to connect to the character she’s playing. The rest of the cast is pretty good, but the movie is too bad for them to be able to save it.

Weekly Movie Reviews: Jul 9-15, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

No Way Out (1987)

Navy officer Tom Farrell (Kevin Costner) gets a new job as one of the aides of Secretary of Defense David Brice (Gene Hackman). At around the same time, he starts a relationship with Susan Atwell (Sean Young), a beautiful woman who is unhappily involved with a powerful man. His work and personal lives collide violently when Susan is killed right after he leaves her house one night, and he is put in charge of the investigation to find her killer.

No Way Out is one of the best kinds of movies, it surprises you in a good way. You watch it and for most of it you think it’s a pretty average movie and that it’s a competent thriller but some of the things it’s doing just don’t make sense. You wish that writers would be a little more detail-oriented, but you’re used to movies that don’t get the details right. And then by the end, you realize that the wool’s been pulled over your eyes and the movie has used your expectations of it to hide its brilliance in plain sight. The story is not anything new, but the way it’s told is.

Kevin Costner does a fantastic job as Farrell – he’s intense but likeable, and I read somewhere that this was the movie that launched his career as a leading man. Gene Hackman is terrific as always, and Will Patton was amazing too, he really added subtlety to a character that could’ve easily been over the top.

Other Movies Watched

Get Shorty (1995)

Chili Palmer (John Travolta), a mobster/loan shark based in Miami flies to Hollywood to collect on a debt and decides to try to make a career out of producing films. He falls in with horror movie producer Harry Zimm (Gene Hackman), who he’s also supposed to be collecting money from, and discovers that he has a natural aptitude for the movie business – it’s not so different from what he knows. I’m not entirely sure how to describe this movie, I guess it’s sort of an action-comedy and it’s pretty great. It’s got a dry sense of humor (which I love) and the characters are mostly just archetypes, but it makes the ridiculous look normal and even desirable. There’s murder, mayhem, and at least six different agendas in play at any given time, but it all works fantastically well. I’m looking forward to seeing the sequel, Be Cool where Chili takes on the music business.

Boys on the Side (1995)

Jane (Whoopi Goldberg), a perpetually unsuccessful musician, decides to move from New York to Los Angeles in the hopes that she will get better work there. She answers an advertisement from Robin (Mary-Louise Parker) who is looking for a driver to drive to San Diego with her. Along the way, they pick up Jane’s friend Holly (Drew Barrymore), and despite their initial differences, all three women become friends. The first half of this movie is a standard roadtrip movie (although self-aware, the characters even reference Thelma and Louise), and the second half turns into a more serious movie about friendship and consequences. It was a lot more heartfelt than I thought it would be and I would definitely recommend it, especially if you like movies like Steel Magnolias or even Singles or Reality Bites.

Ghost in the Shell (2017)

I like that Hollywood is making more media influenced by anime (the excellent Pacific Rim, the upcoming Death Note), I’ve found that anime often tells stories with characters and ideas that other media rarely explores. Although I haven’t seen the original Ghost in the Shell movies and series, I’ve been looking forward to watching this movie. Scarlett Johansson plays an anti-terrorism officer, Major Mira Killian, who is the first person with an entirely manufactured body – only her brain is human. While tracking down a skilled hacker, she comes to realize that she may not be who she’s always believed herself to be. I enjoyed this movie, although I didn’t love it, its world felt a little too CG and generic. I also liked that the movie was set in Japan and it handled the issue of Scarlett Johansson playing an originally Japanese character very well.

Forever Young (1992)

After suffering a terrible loss, military test pilot Captain Daniel McCormick volunteers to undergo cryonic freezing as part of a top secret experiment. He is meant to be frozen for a year, but World War II breaks out and the experiment is mislaid as a result of the chaos, so he ends up accidentally being revived in the 90s instead. This is a pretty standard sci-fi movie of the era, complete with a cute kid and his family, a chase scene involving running from the government for no apparent reason, and a very convenient ending (also it was written by J.J. Abrams back when he was still credited as “Jeffrey Abrams”). The actors are great, though, and they make the movie seem better than it is – especially Mel Gibson as Daniel and Elijah Wood as the kid, Nat.

Barely Lethal (2015)

Hailee Steinfield plays Agent 83, a teenage spy and assassin who has been trained from birth as part of a secret government program. When she finally graduates and is sent on field missions, she uses her newfound freedom to watch teen movies and fantasize about high school, eventually faking her death to attend high school for real. Of course, high school is scarier than she thought it would be. This movie is all over the place, and if you think about the plot even a little, you’ll realize it makes no sense. But, Hailee Steinfield is a great actress, and her charisma makes this a pretty fun movie. And I did like the teenage boys’ absolute lack of personality other than being objects of desire, it was a nice subversion of the usual tropes (although I’m not sure if the movie did that intentionally or if it was just bad characterization).

Les Visiteurs (1993)

Les Visiteurs is a French movie starring Jean Reno and Christian Clavier as a 12th century knight and his servant who end up modern-day France after a spell goes wrong. I was excited to watch this movie, I’ve loved Jean Reno in everything I’ve seen him in, and I assumed this movie would be good because it had an American remake and a couple of sequels. I ended up being disappointed, though. It’s not like the movie is bad – I think it knows what it wants to do and does it well, but I don’t have the same sense of humor that it does. I think it’s somewhat realistic in that modern-day humans would in fact find people from the 12th century somewhat disgusting, but it’s a dedicated comedy and doesn’t actually examine any of that.

Weekly Movie Reviews: Jul 2-8, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

Set It Off (1996)

Frankie Sutton is fired from her job as a bank teller after her bank is robbed by someone who she happened to know. After her efforts to find a new job fail due to the bank’s refusal to give her a recommendation, she ends up working at a janitorial service with her friends Stony, Cleo, and T.T. All four women need money for various endeavors but feel like they are stuck in a cycle of poverty that they can’t get out of. Eventually they decide to use Frankie’s inside knowledge and rob a bank so that they can make a better life for themselves.

Set It Off is directed by F. Gary Grey, who also did Friday and Straight Outta Compton. He’s really good at making his characters believable, and that’s in evidence here as well. This movie is not a heist or a caper, it’s a serious story about four women who truly believe that robbing a bank is the best option they have because they feel like they have tried everything else. I’ve seen comparisons to Thelma and Louise in various reviews, and yes, both movies have female friends committing crimes together, but Thelma and Louise were bored, not desperate.

Pretty much everyone in this movie gives a terrific performance, especially Vivica A. Fox, Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah, and Kimberley Elise as the four central characters. John C. McGinley’s cop character was portrayed almost as sympathetically as the main characters – they’re not really going up against each other, they’re going up against society.

Other Movies Watched

The Lost City of Z (2016)

The Lost City of Z is based on the true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett and his search for an ancient lost city in South America. It takes a lot of liberties with the original events but it tells a captivating story. It’s set over almost two decades, following Fawcett as his fascination with his hypothetical city increases and how he struggles to balance it with the realization that his family feels like he has abandoned them. Charlie Hunnam does an excellent job as Fawcett, his portrayal is complex and nuanced, and I didn’t exactly like the character but I understood him. I wasn’t familiar with Fawcett’s story so the ending of the movie came out of nowhere, but I liked it after I got used to it.

Children Who Chase Lost Voices (2011)

We’re going through Makoto Shinkai’s filmography fairly quickly (see last week’s reviews), and Children Who Chase Lost Voices is up next. After a boy named Shun saves schoolgirl Asuna from a monster and is found dead soon after, she and her teacher Mr. Morisaki make their way into the mythic land of Agartha, where it is said the dead can be brought back to life.  This movie is beautiful and it reminded me of several Ghibli movies (especially Castle in the Sky), both in its animation style and storyline. It’s well told, but it was a little too melancholy to be emotionally satisfying. Shinkai’s other films share the same melancholy but it works better in his more romance-focused films.

Warcraft (2016)

I was pretty excited about this movie because it’s directed by Duncan Jones (director of Moon and Source Code, which are both great sci-fi movies). And unlike Assassin’s Creed, the last video game movie I had high hopes for, it’s pretty darn good! I’ve never played any of the Warcraft games but I found the story compelling. A tribe of orcs fleeing their dying planet invade the world of Azeroth, and the king of Stormwind must figure out how to respond. The movie starts out from the orcs’ perspective and establishes that they’re just people too, with their own individual desires, and it keeps that theme throughout – both men and orcs have good and evil within them, and the conflict is not black and white. I would gladly watch a lot more movies set in this world if they were all this good.

I Am Not A Serial Killer (2016)

John Wayne Cleaver (Max Records) is a teenager from a small Midwestern town. He’s a clinically diagnosed sociopath and he has a set of rules that he rigidly follows in order to keep himself from following his violent desires. But when a serial killer starts operating in his town, he has to do something about it, even if it means breaking all his own rules. I don’t usually watch a lot of movies with horror elements, but this is based on a book written by Dan Wells (who I know from speculative fiction writing podcast Writing Excuses). It ended up being a much better movie than I thought it would be; it seemed more like a drama than a horror movie, the protagonist isn’t constantly in danger, and even scenes that you think will end badly mostly end up being fine. Max Records (who is apparently the boy from Where the Wild Things Are) and Christopher Lloyd are both great in their roles, giving their characters humanity at the oddest moments. I’m not convinced that John is a sociopath, though; he might think he is, but he cares too much.

The Secret of My Success (1987)

Brantley Foster, a farm boy from Kansas, is determined to do well and rise quickly at his new job in New York City. When the job falls through at the last minute, the only work he can find is in the mailroom of Pemrose, the large corporation that his uncle manages. Undeterred, he vows to be successful and soon finds that the mailroom offers a lot more opportunities than he originally anticipated. The Secret of My Success was pretty funny, it reminded me of a screwball comedy from the 30s/40s, although it also had some slapstick and physical comedy. I find young Michael J. Fox irresistible, especially when he’s playing an upstart, and he makes it impossible to not like the movie.

Wild Wild West (1999)

Jim West (Will Smith), a cocksure Army officer/gunslinger is forced to team up with Artemus Gordon (Kevin Kline), a U.S. marshal/inventor/master of disguise to save President Ulysses S. Grant from an evil ex-Confederate inventor who was unhappy with how the Civil War turned out. I knew this movie was going to be terrible before we watched it so I was mostly watching it for the tropes and ridiculousness. I would never call it anything approaching a good movie, but it’s still got some enjoyable qualities. Kevin Kline is a great actor, and even though he’s underused here, he’s still got great comic timing. The genre of the movie was interesting too, it’s got some steampunk/weird Western elements to it, and I don’t think those were all that popular when the movie was made.

“Red Sister” by Mark Lawrence

This review of Red Sister is long overdue, I read it way back in April but never got around to reviewing it since I was already backlogged on reviews. Luckily, it’s one of the best books that I read this year and I still remember it very well.

Red Sister follows Nona Grey, a young girl accused of a heinous crime and sent away from her home. She ends up at the Convent of Sweet Mercy, where children with the right heritage are taught to be deadly killers and powerful mages. She finds more than just a place to live, she is truly challenged for the first time, she uncovers parts of her personality she never knew had and makes friends closer than family. But Nona’s considerable talents and violent past put her in the middle of long-simmering power struggles within the church and the empire, and she makes quite a few enemies as well.

This book is one of my favorite sub-genres of fantasy, the coming of age and training of the main character. Most of Red Sister is set entirely in the convent, which seems likes it could get boring fast but ends up being utterly riveting. Nona is a great protagonist –  she can be pretty intense at times which makes her both scary and vulnerable, she’s got an interesting backstory, and she reacts like a real person to the things that happen around her (unlike many fantasy characters). It is a pleasure to watch her slowly transform from a mistrustful and hurt young girl to the confident and formidable person that she is at the end.

The most unique thing about this book is the way it depicts female friendships. I can think of a bunch of different books that have great male friendships (Riyria’s Royce and Hadrian, the Gentemen Bastards’ Locke and Jean, to name a couple) but I really can’t think of many books that draw attention to women who are friends. Red Sister doesn’t just focus on them, it makes them the core of the book – Nona’s friendships drive her to grow, provide a source of tension (without melodrama), and make for some pretty heartwarming moments. Yes, there’s a lot of intrigue and action, but none of it would matter if we didn’t care about these relationships so much.

I also really liked the world that this book was set in. It reminded me of N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth books – it’s a world that’s slowly dying, and the people living in it now that have access to technology but any understanding of how it all works has been lost for generations.  So far, the state of the world hasn’t made much of an impact on Nona’s life, but I assume it will become more relevant in the next two books.

I can’t wait for the next book, Grey Sister, to come out! At least I haven’t read most of Mark Lawrence’s other work, so I have something to tide me over.


Red Sister by Mark Lawrence (Book of the Ancestor, #1)
Ace Books, 2017 | Buy the book
I received a complimentary review copy of this book.


“The Guns Above” by Robyn Bennis

I’ve been binge reading the Dresden Files for the last month, and whenever I read a long series that I get really into, I almost invariably dislike the next book I read because it can’t compare to the bond I’ve built with the characters I’ve spent so much time with recently. The Guns Above is one of those few books that put the “almost” in the previous sentence, because despite the odds, I really liked it.

Josette Dupre has just become the first female airship captain in the history of the Garnian military, promoted for her distinction in battle by direct order of the king. This doesn’t sit too well with the the general in charge of the ongoing war and her new command ends up being an untested and probably dangerous airship. To make matters worse, she is ordered to take the general’s nephew, Lord Bernat, along as an observer on her mission to and she knows that his job is to report her behavior unfavorably no matter what she does.

This book reminded me a lot of the Shadow Campaigns series by Django Wexler – they have a similar technology level (minus the airships), and both are about women who are soldiers above everything else. The airships and how they work are described in loving detail, and it helps make the world feel lived-in. The plot is fairly basic, but it feels exciting because there’s a lot of action that’s very well done and uses the airships in ways unique to their design.

I am often skeptical of steampunk books because I’ve read a few of them that are great about describing the technology and world, but don’t do a great job with the characters. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that characterization was one of this book’s biggest strengths. All the characters seem like normal people, admirable in some ways, deeply annoying in others, and very relatable overall. Bernat is an insufferable jerk and never really ceases being one, but the author somehow manages to make him lovable somehow. Josette is witty, courageous, and determined to a fault, but the flip side of that is that her single-mindedness makes her pretty scary and/or mean on occasion. And even though she is relentless in the air, she’s still vulnerable when facing people with the power to take away what she loves. Both Josette and Bernat are both viewpoint characters, which is fun because for most of the book, they’re never more than a few feet from each other and so we’re getting wildly different perspectives on the same events in real time.

The Guns Above is the first of a series, but you wouldn’t know that from the ending, it tells a complete story without any cliffhangers. And it’s a debut novel, which I wouldn’t have guessed from how polished it is. I’ll definitely be reading further books in the series.


The Guns Above by Robyn Bennis (Signal Airship, #1)
Tor Books, 2017 | Buy the book
I received a complimentary review copy of this book.


“Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows” by Balli Kaur Jaswal

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows is not my usual genre, but one of my reading goals this year was to diversify my reading by reading at least ten fiction books that were not science fiction or fantasy When I saw it on the LibraryThing Early Reviewers list, I requested it because I’m interested in the Indian diaspora and I figured it would help get closer to my non-genre fiction goal (I’m doing terribly, including this one, I’ve read two so far this year).

Contrary to the title, this book is not erotica (although it does contain some). Nikki, a young British woman from a Punjabi family, works part-time as a bartender (to the consternation of her family) while she figures out what she wants to do with her life. To earn some extra money, she signs up to teach creative writing at the local Sikh community center. Due to a miscommunication, her students (mostly widows who are not expected have a social life) show up expecting to learn basic English skills. The class seems like it is heading into disaster but when Nikki’s students accidentally find a book of erotica that she bought as a joke, the ice is broken and the class transforms into a space where her students feel comfortable expressing ideas normally deemed taboo.

I didn’t know anything about the Sikh community of Southall, and the author does a good job of setting the atmosphere and making it feel like a whole world unto itself that I was interested in learning more about. The book alternates between the point of view of Nikki, who is modern/easy to relate to and Kulwinder (the woman who hired her), who is more traditional.  This helps readers understand Nikki’s students better as well since we have an outside perspective about the same events that Nikki is reacting to.

I didn’t find Nikki to be a compelling protagonist, I couldn’t get a sense of who she was as a person. She doesn’t have a lot of agency, most of the book is just her reacting to events happening around her. Even the evolution of her class is pretty much entirely driven by her students, I didn’t see what she contributed to it. I’m also not a big fan of romantic subplots unless they’re done very well, and the one in this book was fairly generic, and it had a bunch of drama around my least favorite trope – people refusing to talk to other people. Actually, the rest of the drama around Nikki’s students wasn’t very interesting, either, mainly because the characters didn’t draw me in enough to care what their secrets were. However, Kulwinder’s story and growth arc brought the book up a notch, it’s a little melodramatic but she’s a more unique character and that helps.

The book is interspersed with examples of erotica produced by Nikki’s class, which also helps liven the book up a bit and provides some humor. Overall, I thought this was a pretty decent book, although I didn’t love it.


Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal
William Morrow, 2017 | Buy the book
I received a complimentary review copy of this book.


Weekly Movie Reviews: Jun 25-Jul 1, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

The Edge of Seventeen (2016)

I was excited to watch The Edge of Seventeen because it got great reviews. Going into a movie with a lot of hype usually leads to disappointment regardless of how good it is, but there are rare occasions where a movie manages to live up to your expectations. Fortunately, this was one of those occasions.

The tagline for this movie is “You’re only young once… is it over yet?”, which pretty much sums it up. Nadine (Hailee Steinfield) is a high school junior who already finds her life unbearable enough – her dad has been dead for a few years, her mom is self-involved and doesn’t care about her problems, her brother is handsome and popular and can’t understand what she’s going through, and she has a crush on somebody who doesn’t seem to know she exists. To make things worse, her best (and only) friend starts dating her older brother so now she doesn’t have any friends either.

The plot of this movie doesn’t really matter. It’s a coming of age story, but what makes it unique is the visceral exploration of what it’s like to be a teenage girl and it does a better job of it than any other movie I’ve seen. The combination of thinking the world revolves around you but being crippled by self-esteem issues, the constant need to define your identity, post-pubescent hormones that you haven’t gotten used to yet pushing you in directions you would never normally go – I didn’t think they could be represented in film so well. The credit goes to both Hailee Steinfield and writer/director Kelly Fremon Craig (in her directorial debut), and I expect even greater things from both in the future.

Other Movies Watched

5 Centimeters per Second (2007)

Makoto Shinkai is one of Japanese animation’s most famous names – Wikipedia describes him as a “director, writer, producer, animator, editor, cinematographer, voice actor, manga artist and former graphic designer”. We’ve been meaning to watch all of his movies, but the recent release of the critically acclaimed Your Name pushed us into action. We’re watching the movies in the order they were released, and 5 Centimeters per Second is his third film. It’s only an hour long and it’s a series of three connected short films set a few years apart and focusing on a boy named Takaki as he grows up. It’s a bittersweet story and it pulled me in emotionally without me noticing until the end. I highly recommend it.

Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Romeo + Juliet was one of the earliest movies my husband and I tried to watch together, but I wasn’t a fan of movies back then and found it too cacophonous and overwhelming. It is an adaptation of Shakespeare’s play, set in modern California with a soundtrack of modern songs. The dialogue, however, is not modern – it all comes directly from the play, sometimes interpreted quite creatively. The Montagues and the Capulets are reinterpreted as bitterly feuding Mafia families, the weapons are guns with brand names like “Sword” and “Dagger”, and so on. Romeo and Juilet are played by Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes, and I can’t think of better casting than that, especially in the mid-90s. The whole movie rests on them, and they’ve both been fantastic actors ever since they were young, they make the archaic dialogue sound completely natural. It’s still a pretty cacophonous and overwhelming movie, but it’s also brilliant.

Big Night (1996)

Stanley Tucci co-wrote, co-directed (in his directorial debut), and starred in this movie about two Italian brothers Primo and Secondo (played Tony Shalhoub and Tucci, respectively) who organize a big party involving a famous musician in a bid to save their failing restaurant. I thought this would be one of those feel-good indie dramas, but it’s not really about the restaurant, it’s a serious exploration of the immigrant experience (the movie is set in the 1950s) and the relationship between the brothers. Primo is fiercely proud of his cuisine, his culture, and his talents, whereas Secondo is more pragmatic and tries to integrate into American life a little more. Tony Shalhoub and Stanley Tucci both do a fantastic job, and the rest of the cast (including great actors like Ian Holm, Allison Janney, Minnie Driver, Isabella Rossellini, and co-director Campbell Scott) are excellent too. Also, if you look closely, you can spot a young Liev Schreiber in one of his earliest roles.

The Place Promised in Our Early Days (2004)

This is Makoto Shinkai’s second movie (and first full-length movie) after his solo effort Voices of a Distant Star. It’s set in an alternate history where Japan was divided into two occupation zones – Russian and American. We follow three friends, Hiroki, Takuya, and Sayuri in the American zone who are captivated by a tall tower on the Russian side and promise each other to fly to it to see what it is. When Sayuri disappears one day without saying goodbye, Hiroki and Takuya grow apart and abandon their promise, but three years later, Takuya can’t just let it go. The only complaint I had about this movie was that the pacing was a little slow. After we watched it, my husband described it as “a mix of Studio Ghibli and Evangelion”, and I think that’s spot on (in a good way). The plot and the younger versions of the characters reminded me of a lot of Ghibli movies, especially since it centered so much on flying, and the worldbuilding and older versions of the characters seemed like they could fit comfortably in the Evangelion mythos.

Hollywood Homicide (2003)

Harrison Ford and Josh Hartnett play LAPD detectives investigating the murder of a up and coming hip hop group in a crowded club. This is a pretty standard buddy cop comedy and it pokes fun at cops, LA culture, the entertainment business, and so on. Harrison Ford’s character is a real estate agent and Josh Hartnett’s character is a yoga teacher/aspiring actor, and they both have a little bit of trouble keeping their off-duty lives out of their jobs. I was hoping that director Ron Shelton would make this movie as engrossing as his sports films, but, despite being fun, it turned out to be fairly unmemorable. Maybe I would have been more impressed with this movie if I hadn’t seen Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and The Nice Guys, but Shane Black fills this niche way better.

Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997)

I knew before we watched this that the Austin Powers movies weren’t really my type, but they’re a cultural phenomenon and I wanted to get around to watching them someday. If for some reason you haven’t heard of them, they’re James Bond spoofs (based mostly on the 60s Bond movies, with a healthy dose of hippie culture mixed in), written by and starring Mike Myers (in multiple roles). I’m glad we watched a bunch of the Connery Bond movies before watching this, I got a lot more of the jokes. But overall, the humor is pretty crude and much of it comes from taking a joke so far that it’s so much past the point of not even funny anymore that it’s supposed to become funny again, I guess. I’m glad I watched it because now I can get references to it, and we’ll probably watch the other two movies eventually, but not because they’re good.

I would have put this below Michael on the list based on enjoyment, but at least this movie knew exactly what it wanted to be and succeeded, whereas what Michael wanted to be was unfathomable.

Michael (1996)

This is a terrible, terrible movie about two tabloid reporters who investigate a claim that the archangel Michael has been living in Iowa for a few months. To their surprise, it turns out to be true, but the real Michael is hardly angelic – he chain smokes, he picks up women everywhere he goes, and he’s played by John Travolta. For some reason when I watched this movie, i almost felt like I was watching a movie from an alternate Earth where everyone was operating under a different set of assumptions than our Earth, but I can’t be more specific than that the movie felt off somehow. The actors do a fine job with the material they have, and I know Nora Ephron is a good director usually, but this was a dud.

Weekly Movie Reviews: Jun 18-24, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

Two Days, One Night (2014)

I’m not sure where I heard about this Belgian movie (Deux jours, une nuit), but it’s been on our list for a while. Marion Cotillard plays Sandra, a woman about to go back to work after medical leave for depression. She finds out that her boss asked her colleagues to vote to choose between firing her and receiving a bonus, and they chose the bonus. Her boss agrees to hold the vote a second time, and she has one weekend to persuade her colleagues to change their vote.

From reading the description, I thought this was going to be a comedy-drama, but it turned out to just be a drama, and much better than I thought it would be. Sandra is still dealing with her depression and anxiety, and going around persuading people to give up money so that she can still have her job is not something that is particularly helpful to her mental state. Marion Cotillard was nominated for the Best Actress Oscar for her work in this movie (despite it being a foreign film that wasn’t nominated for any other Oscars) and she does a great job of putting you in Sandra’s headspace – it’s not the most comfortable thing but makes her infinitely relatable. The rest of the characters in the movie also seem like realistic people, and you think you’re just watching people react to each other in a uncomfortable situation, but by the end, a satisfying story has sneaked up on you.

I found out while doing research for this review that the directors, the Dardenne brothers, are well-known for making great movies, and I will definitely be watching more of their work.

Other Movies Watched

Genius (2016)

Genius tells the story of the relationship between famed editor Max Perkins (who discovered F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway) and idiosyncratic author Thomas Wolfe. Perkins recognizes genius in Wolfe’s long, rambling work, and he is willing to put in the time and effort to publish it, and the two of them embark on a profitable (but sometimes all-consuming) partnership. Colin Firth is great at playing dependable and reassuring characters, and he’s in his comfort zone playing Perkins. Jude Law is also well-cast as the charming, manic, selfish, incorrigible Wolfe – he’s played similar characters before (like Dickie Greenleaf in The Talented Mr. Ripley). I loved that this movie was about writing books, and a lot of the best scenes were about the business of editing and figuring out what words made sense. I’m probably biased there, but even if you don’t love books more than anything, it’s still a solid historical drama.

Twister (1996)

Twister follows a group of storm chasers led by about-to-divorce couple Bill and Jo Harding as they try to launch some new instrumentation into a tornado. It is described as a “disaster film” on Wikipedia, but I don’t really think the term applies since the protagonists actually want to be where they are – it’s not something they are unwittingly caught up in. I’ve watched this movie before, and it still holds up. I particularly love Helen Hunt’s character Jo, who plays a smart and competent (if somewhat obsessive) scientist – I think she’d get along well with Ellie Arroway from Contact. She’s also got great chemistry with Bill Paxton, and it makes you actually invested in their relationship. Some of the movie is a little cheesy, but it’s mostly just fun with a group of lovably eccentric characters.

The Constant Gardener (2005)

I’ve enjoyed the other movies I’ve seen based on John le Carré’s books (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, The Tailor of Panama), they are quiet and thoughtful spy movies with interesting characters. The Constant Gardener is in that same vein and did not let me down. Ralph Fiennes plays Justin Quayle, a British diplomat living in Kenya. When his wife is killed in suspicious circumstances, he tries to find the perpetrators while reexamining their relationship and the things she kept from him. It’s as much a movie about a relationship as it is about a conspiracy, and both are very well done. Ralph Fiennes is fantastic as Quayle, the setting of Kenya seems more authentic than other movies and lends a great atmosphere, and the storytelling is slow but powerful.

American Ultra (2015)

Jesse Eisenberg stars in this movie about Mike Howell, a small-town stoner who is (unknown to himself) a product of a failed CIA experiment to produce covert operatives. When the CIA decides that he is a liability and needs to be exterminated, he proves to be a hard person to kill as all his old skills kick in. This is a pretty ridiculous and over-the-top movie, but it’s also a lot of fun. Jesse Eisenberg and Kristen Stewart (who plays his girlfriend) play the stoner couple to perfection, and their chemistry keeps things grounded even when everything is exploding around them. American Ultra reminded me a little bit of Zombieland – it’s has a similar tone of campy/goofy/scary with actually likeable characters.

Beverly Hills Cop (1984)

We’re slowly but surely going through all the famous buddy cop movies of the 80s, and Beverly Hills Cop was next. Eddie Murphy plays Detroit cop Axel Foley who visits Beverly Hills on “vacation” to try and solve the murder of his friend. Foley is a talented detective but he’s also willful and has a problem with authority, so he runs afoul of the local law enforcement pretty quickly – until he actually finds something, anyway. Eddie Murphy has great comic timing and makes Foley lovable instead of obnoxious, and the rest is a pretty typical buddy cop type movie. Also, I’ve been familiar with the “Axel F” theme from the soundtrack for over a decade, and I finally got to see where it came from!

Dune (1984)

I read Dune a long time ago, and as much as it hurts to admit it as a die hard science-fiction fan, I didn’t like it very much, despite its classic status. I did enjoy the worldbuilding, though, so I was cautiously looking forward to watching this movie. We follow Paul Atreides (played by Kyle MacLachlan), a young man from a noble family, as he overcomes his circumstances as the victim of a conspiracy and eventually rises to greatness. It’s a pretty weird movie, the characters aren’t quite relatable (they were faithful to the book in this regard), and the set and character designs can be pretty uncomfortable. It is unique though, and I’d happily watch more movies in this universe if they had made any.

Weekly Movie Reviews: Jun 11-18, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

Ocean Waves (1993)

Ocean Waves was the only Studio Ghibli movie that I hadn’t seen – it was made for television and didn’t involve any of the big Ghibli names, but still. We were going to watch it a few months ago, but realized that it was being released in Blu-Ray in the U.S. soon, so we decided to wait for it.

Taku Morisaki is on his way back to his hometown of Kōchi for his high-school reunion. On the flight, he reminisces about his high school days, and in particular, his friendship with Yutaka Matsuno and Rikako Muto (who he thought he glimpsed at the train station earlier). Most of the story is told via flashback, although there is some present-day story as well (similar to Only Yesterday).

The movie is well-made and tells a heartwarming story. I’d read various reviews saying that this movie wasn’t as good as the other Ghibli movies, but I think it’s still pretty darn good. The animation style is a little different, and it doesn’t fit Miyazaki or Takahata’s styles exactly (this was the first Ghibli movie not directed by one of them), but it has a little bit of Miyazaki’s warmth and Takahata’s focus on ordinary people. I also really liked the protagonist, he was unusually outspoken and that endeared him to me.

Other Movies Watched

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016)

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot stars Tina Fey as Kim Baker (based on Kim Barker, who wrote the memoir the movie was adapted from), a rookie journalist sent to Afghanistan in 2003 to cover the war there. At first, she is overwhelmed by culture shock but soon manages to carve a niche for herself. I assumed this movie would be more like War Machine – mostly comedic, but it actually had quite a bit of heart, helped along by the always lovable Martin Freeman. It reminded me a little bit of The Hurt Locker, which also deals with how the weirdness of the War on Terror changes people. Tina Fey is perfect for the role of Baker, awkward and uncomfortable with herself at first, eventually growing into someone formidable.

 Cop Car (2015)

Two kids find a seemingly abandoned police car in the middle of nowhere and decide to take it for a spin. However, the car isn’t actually abandoned, and the local sheriff who owns it (played by Kevin Bacon) is willing to go to any length to get it back. Cop Car is a quiet movie with a small cast of characters, but it packs a lot of punch. It’s got a great atmosphere, set in a bleak, dusty town in the middle of nowhere. It’s well-paced and trusts its audience to a degree that most films don’t  – it’s intensely focused on the current situation and lets you fill in all the backstory on your own with only a few hints. The two kids who play the protagonists do a great job, too.

Play It to the Bone (2000)

I’m not a big sports fan, but watching Ron Shelton’s Bull Durham and Tin Cup made me way more interested in baseball and golf, respectively. So, I was excited to watch this movie about Cesar (Antonio Banderas) and Vince (Woody Harrelson), professional boxers and best friends who are about to face each other in the ring for the first time. The entire movie is set over a single day as the two friends drive to Las Vegas for the match, so it’s both a boxing movie and a roadtrip movie. As I expected, Shelton’s direction makes the boxing far more engrossing that I would’ve expected, grounding it with some great character development ahead of time. However, I wasn’t a huge fan of the character of Grace, the woman who drives Cesar and Vince to Las Vegas, and has dated both of them – she seemed too much like Annie from Bull Durham, but not as good.

Imperium (2016)

Nate, a young (and somewhat nerdy) FBI agent, is recruited to go undercover and join a white supremacist group suspected of stealing some radioactive material. This movie isn’t that good but Daniel Radcliffe gives a fantastic performance. I still kind of think of him as either Harry Potter or someone who plays weird/shifty characters (see Now You See Me 2 and The Gamechangers), but he’s really believable as an American FBI agent playing things straight. The movie is somewhat cliched, but I did appreciate its attempts to cause some conflict for Nate by showing that white supremacists are people too, and you can find things to like about them just like everyone else (like sharing a love of classical music). It’s nowhere near as good as American History X, though.

Minions (2015)

After watching the two Despicable Me movies, we had to watch Minions. I expected it to be flashy and fun, but pretty shallow, and that’s exactly what it ended up being. It’s set a few decades before the other movies, when the Minions come out of hiding to try and find a new master to serve. Their first choice is Scarlet Overkill, the first female supervillain, and they are thrilled when she accepts them into their service. But when their first mission goes wrong, she turns out to be a terrible master. Summarizing this movie isn’t easy, when I think back to the plot, it doesn’t really make any sense – it’s definitely a movie made just for kids and not both kids and adults. But it’s entertaining enough while you’re watching it, so I guess that’s good.

The 5th Wave (2016)

Chloe Grace Moretz stars in this movie about a teenage girl trying to find her younger brother after a catastrophic alien invasion. The 5th Wave is a solid entry into the teen post-apocalyptic movie genre (e.g. Divergent, The Maze Runner, The Hunger Games) and it’s not very good, but my husband and I both love the melodramatic teen drama genre for whatever reason, so we enjoyed watching it. It has all the hallmarks of the genre: two love interests, one who is brooding and mysterious, and the other who is cute/boy-next-door, teenage soldiers fighting, a surprising lack of adults making decisions, characters needing to use basic survival skills even though there’s advanced technology, and so on.

Weekly Movie Reviews: Jun 4-10, 2017

Favorite Movie of the Week

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016)

I first heard about Hunt for the Wilderpeople when I was reading about the upcoming Thor movie, which is also directed by the same person (Taika Waititi). I was excited about it from the minute I read about it – I’ve been enjoying non-American movies more and more recently, and it seemed like it would be an enjoyable kind of quirky.

Ricky Baker is a orphan with a history of getting into trouble, and the only family that will foster him live out on a remote farm. To his surprise, his foster mother is kind and patient, and he’s actually found a real home – at least until she dies suddenly. Now child welfare services wants him back, and through some unfortunate circumstances, he ends up on the run with his curmudgeonly foster father Hector (Sam Neill) in the bush. His child welfare services offer, Paula, takes his escape personally, and a intense manhunt commences.

This movie reminded me a little bit of Moonrise Kingdom, although without all the Wes-Anderson-ness. It’s funny and cute and full of heart, and the actor who plays Ricky is amazing. Sam Neill hasn’t really gotten that much better with children than he was in Jurassic Park, but that’s exactly why he’s so good in this role. I highly recommend this one!

Other Movies Watched

Akeelah and the Bee (2006)

Akeelah Anderson has always been great at spelling, although she tries to hide how smart she is from her classmates because she’s afraid of being bullied. Her teachers and principal notice her talent and push her to compete in regional spelling bees to have a shot at the Scripps National Spelling Bee. I liked this movie a lot – it’s a typical underdog story, but I found it a more realistic portrayal that similar movies. Akeelah has to overcome her own self-doubt and embrace her ability and who she actually is rather than trying to fit in. The cast is great too – Angela Bassett plays the mom and Laurence Fishburne plays the curmudgeonly mentor, but Keke Palmer absolutely steals the show as Akeelah.

Run Lola Run (1998)

I remember enjoying this movie when I first watched it more than eight years ago but I didn’t remember any details about it. I’m always fascinated by the idea of little decisions having a big impact on how things turn out, and Run Lola Run is probably one of the movies that examines this best. After receiving a panicked call from her boyfriend, a small-time criminal, Lola has 20 minutes to acquire 100,000 marks and get them to him to prevent his boss from killing him (literally). The movie shows us three iterations of her 20 minute run and how each turns out. It’s a fast-paced movie, there are a lot of details to pay attention to (as is often the case with this kind of story), and it’s just very well done. Watch it!

The Nice Guys (2016)

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang writer/director Shane Black is back again with another black comedy neo-noir buddy cop movie set in Hollywood, and it’s almost as good. PI Holland March (Ryan Gosling) and enforcer Jackson Healey (Russell Crowe) encounter each other (violently) while investigating different angles on the same case and eventually decide to team up. This movie is set in the 70s, and that’s actually a big part of its atmosphere – it doesn’t happen to be set in the 70s, that fact defines its identity. The comedic elements are funny and the characters have heart, especially thanks to March’s (precocious, of course) daughter Holly. I would have liked it more if it had been a little bit more serious, but it’s still a good movie.

Despicable Me (2010)

I wasn’t expecting a lot from Despicable Me based on the trailers, but it turned out to be surprisingly good. Our protagonist is Gru, an aging supervillain who is trying to pull off the biggest heist of his life. In order to retrieve the shrink ray (needed for the heist) that a rival supervillain stole from him, he adopts three young girls from a nearby orphanage. They turn out to be more than he bargained for, and his whole life turns upside down. The three girls are absolutely adorable, and it’s nearly impossible not to fall in love with them. Without them, the movie wouldn’t be anywhere near as good, even with all the great voice actors.

Despicable Me 2 (2013)

Newly retired supervillain Gru and his three adorable daughters are back. Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League as an undercover agent to foil a dastardly plot involving a serum that turns anything that drinks it into ravening monsters. In addition, he also has to deal with eccentric AVL agent Lucy Wilde, his daughter Margo’s first crush on an entirely unsuitable boy, and the resignation of longtime employee Dr. Nefario. These movies aren’t deep, but they’re cute and a lot of fun. I particularly liked Dr. Nefario’s role in this one. Lucy annoyed me in the beginning, but she grew on me by the end.

War Machine (2017)

War Machine is a satirical look at the war in Afghanistan through the eyes of General Glen McMahon, who is sent to command the NATO forces and help “win the war”. It is a thankless job in a very complicated situation, but McMahon is idealistic to a fault and believes that he can really make a difference. I wanted to like this movie more than I did – the actors do a good job, especially Brad Pitt, who plays the protagonist. Ultimately it seemed directionless and more like a farce than a satire – everything is so over the top that it doesn’t end up saying anything consequential.